Arthritis eBook; Chapter 1, What is Arthritis

WHAT IS ARTHRITIS

Chapter 1; Introduction

Arthritis is a term coined from two Greek words, athro (joint) and itis (inflammation). It is a condition whose main presenting symptoms are pain (arthralgia), stiffness and swelling in the joints. Arthritis can affect only one joint (mono articular) or many joints (poly articular) in a person.

The presence of pain and swelling in a joint is a manifestation of an underlying condition.

Prevalence of arthritis

The prevalence of arthritis may vary from country to country. It is hard to come up with definite figures but various studies have provided estimates. An estimated 40 million Americans had arthritis and the number is expected to increase to 59.4 million by the year 2020 (18% increase). This is just an example and figures vary with country.

Lear...

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A dual role for UCMA in osteoarthritis-Inhibition of aggrecanases and promotion of bone turnover

Abstract

Objective: Cartilage damage and subchondral bone changes are closely connected in osteoarthritis. How these processes are interlinked is however incompletely understood to date. Here, we investigate the mechanistic role of the cartilage-derived protein UCMA in osteoarthritis-related cartilage and bone changes.

Methods: UCMA expression was assessed in healthy and osteoarthritic human and mouse cartilage. DMM-induced osteoarthritis was performed in WT and Ucma-deficient mice analysing cartilage and bone changes. UCMA-collagen interactions, effect of UCMA on aggrecanase activity and the impact of recombinant UCMA on osteoclast differentiation were studied in vitro.

Results: UCMA was found overexpressed in human and mouse osteoarthritic cartilage...

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Immune-array Analysis in Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis Reveals HLA-DRB1 Amino Acid Heterogeneity across the Myositis Spectrum

Abstract

Objective: Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is characterised by a combination of inflammatory and degenerative changes affecting muscle. While the primary cause of IBM is unknown, genetic factors may influence disease susceptibility. We conducted the largest genetic association study to date in IBM, investigating immune-related genes using the Immunochip.

Methods: 252 Caucasian IBM cases were recruited from 11 countries through the Myositis Genetics Consortium (MYOGEN), and compared with 1,008 ethnically matched controls. Classical HLA alleles and amino acids were imputed using SNP2HLA.

Results: HLA was confirmed as the most strongly associated region (p=3.58×10−33) in IBM. HLA imputation identified three independent associations with HLA-DRB1*03:01, -DRB1*01:01, and –DRB1*13:...

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Immune-Related Adverse Events with the Use of Checkpoint Inhibitors for Immunotherapy of Cancer

Arthritis & Rheumatology

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Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Genetic Heterogeneity of Sjögren’s Syndrome According to Ancestry

ABSTRACT

Objective. Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune disease affecting primarily the lacrimal and salivary glands. The Sjögren’s International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) is an international multisite observational study whose participants have been genotyped on the Omni 2.5M platform and undergone deep phenotyping using common protocol-directed methods, providing a unique opportunity to examine the genetic etiology of SS across ancestry and disease subsets.

Methods. We perform GWAS analyses utilizing dbGaP controls on all subjects (1405 cases, 1622 SICCA controls, 3125 external controls), European (similarly 585, 966, 2580), and Asian (similarly 460, 224, 901) with ancestry adjustments via principal component analyses...

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Download the Full January 2017 Issue PDF

If you have knee osteoarthritis and a meniscus tear, definitely try physical therapy. “If you’re getting progressively better, then stay with it for the complete course of sessions,” says Dr. Spindler. “People who don’t make any progress should consider being evaluated for surgery.” The surgery is called arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. With arthroscopic surgery, the surgeon makes small incisions through which a camera and surgical instruments are inserted.

Arthritis Advisor

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Arthritis and Heart Disease: You Can Lower Your Risk

If you have rheumatoid arthritis, you may have up to twice the risk for heart disease as people without arthritis, which is similar to the risk faced by people with type 2 diabetes. People with other types of inflammatory arthritis, which includes psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and lupus, also may have increased heart disease risk. The connection between arthritis and heart disease is an active area of research, and many questions remain unanswered.

Arthritis Advisor

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2016 Annual Meeting Presidential Address

Arthritis & Rheumatology

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Keep Moving— Even In Winter’s Chill

Winter is here and in the northern parts of the country it is probably cold outside. Does that make your arthritic joints even more painful? Some studies show that certain weather conditions can worsen the pain of osteoarthritis. Other studies find no effect. Ultimately, it is your experience that matters. Cleveland Clinic physical therapist Heidi Lehlbach, PT, finds that for many of her patients, weather, and especially big changes in temperature, affects their joints.

Arthritis Advisor

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